15 of the 24 American Idol 5 finalists plan to thank God first if they win

Five hours of American Idol 5 kick off tonight at 8 p.m. ET with the first quasi-live performances of the season. The top 12 women perform tonight, the top 12 men tomorrow night, and after a dragged-out hour-long episode Thursday, one from each group will go home. That will continue until we’re down to just 12.

So who’s going to win? Professional oddsmakers at Pinnacle Sports say say the odds are on Ace Young (7/2), followed by Katharine McPhee (4/1) and Paris Bennett (5/1). Who’s most likely to go home first? are Bobby Bennett, Brenna Gethers, and Kevin Covias are in a three-way tie for least-likely to win the competition. readaBet has a comparison of the odds from other betting establishments.

Just in case you forgot who the contestants are, FOX’s site has bios and Q&As with each of the contestants. Among other questions, the contestants were asked, “If you win, who will you thank first?” Of the 24, well over half–15–said they’d thank God or Jesus first.

Paris Bennett, Chris Daughtry, Brenna Gethers, Taylor Hicks, Will Maker, Melissa McGhee, Sway, Gedeon McKinney, Kellie Pickler, David Radford, Kinnik Sky, Elliott Yamin all say they will thank God first, most likely for deciding that they are better and more worthy than the other God-lovers. Heather Cox, Mandisa, and Stevie Scott plan to thank Jesus Christ, so they get points for originality.

If you don’t want your American Idol to think that a higher power intervened on their behalf, then your options are Ayla Brown, Bobby Bennett, Bucky Covington, Patrick Hall, Kevin Kovias, Katharine McPhee, Becky O’Donohue, Lisa Tucker, and Ace Young, most of whom plan to thank their parents, family members, or the viewers if they win.

American Idol: Early odds favor Ace Young, Katharine McPhee, Paris Bennett [Gambling 911]
American Idol: Contestants [FOX]

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about the writer

Andy Dehnart is a journalist who has covered reality television for more than 15 years and created reality blurred in 2000. A member of the Television Critics Association, his writing and criticism about television, culture, and media has appeared on NPR and in Playboy, Buzzfeed, and many other publications. Andy, 36, also directs the journalism program at Stetson University in Florida, where he teaches creative nonfiction and journalism. He has an M.F.A. in nonfiction writing and literature from Bennington College. More about reality blurred and Andy.