Exile Island’s immunity idol can be used repeatedly, won’t be played until after votes are cast

Talking about Thursday’s debut of Survivor Panama, Jeff Probst revealed that the immunity idol hidden on Exile Island–the remote location where one person will be sent, alone, every few days–may come into play more than once. That’s because, after it’s used, it will be hidden on the island once again.

Further, and more significantly, “the possessor puts the idol into play after the ballots have already been cast,” Jam! Showbiz reports. That means that if the person who has the most votes cast against them has the idol, the person with the second-fewest amount of votes will go home instead.

Jeff Probst says that this is a huge change. “Now, what if I have the idol and I don’t tell you and what if you vote for me – all of your guys vote for me. I cast my single vote for you and I have idol and you are the one that has to go home. That will screw your game up and everybody knows that any time somebody has been to ‘Exile Island’ that means the Idol could have been found. It means it could have been traded with someone. You don’t know. At one point someone said to me at Tribal Council that…’You know, we think this has just changed the game too much’. I cracked up. That’s definitely a sign it’s working,” he said.

Probst reveals a mild spoiler about episode two, which will feature (highlight to read) “a schoolyard pick-em” that causes “all of the bonds that were created [to] crumble. Probst stated that the switch-up causes even more confusion for one player when they are presented with deals from both of the new tribes”, the paper reports.

Probst also runs down the contestants, who he says are very likable, giving us his thoughts on each one, and he also comments about Richard Hatch’s conviction (“I was very sad to hear what happened and I was sad when I read he was led away in handcuffs because life is hard and people make mistakes. I am not justifying what he did but it is sad to hear it. I feel badly for him and that’s the truth”).

Probst: Exile twist changes ‘Survivor’ game [Jam! Showbiz]

about the writer

Andy Dehnart is a journalist who has covered reality television for more than 15 years and created reality blurred in 2000. A member of the Television Critics Association, his writing and criticism about television, culture, and media has appeared on NPR and in Playboy, Buzzfeed, and many other publications. Andy, 36, also directs the journalism program at Stetson University in Florida, where he teaches creative nonfiction and journalism. He has an M.F.A. in nonfiction writing and literature from Bennington College. More about reality blurred and Andy.