“Average American couple” wants our help to be cast on The Amazing Race for no discernable reason

Campaigning to be cast on a reality show via the Internets is nothing new. However, the phenomenon has apparently reached such a saturation point that a couple is using the web to try to be cast for The Amazing Race without offering a single compelling reason why they should be on our television screens.

Andy and Lisa Pull refer to themselves as “an average American couple” next to an action-packed photo of themselves on a couch with their sock-clad feet up on a table. They describe themselves as “the son of one of the world’s funniest men” and “a sweet and beautiful (cha-ching, 10,000 brownie points!) piano teacher.” I slipped into unconsciousness briefly after reading that. Seriously, they’re probably nice people, but they desperately need a PR rep, or some kind of hook like being sarcastic fat brothers from New Yorker or outrageously hypocritical fundamentalist Christians.

To their credit, the Pulls don’t want money, and ask anyone who wants to send them money (why?) to send money to a charity instead. They are, however, expecting you to spam people with their message and then take the fall for it, as they already have a place on their web site to commiserate if you “got banned from your email address for sending our chain letter, or if your CEO reprimanded you for wasting company resources by sending it to the whole office.” Would you get fired for “an average American couple”?

So far, 156 people have somehow been persuaded to sign the petition, although no famous person has yet to add their name to the list.

The Amazing Race petition at gopulls.com

The Quest ends its journey stronger than it began

Verlox from The Quest

A review of the finale of summer's best reality series, which wasn't always perfect but was thoroughly entertaining right down to the finish, which included phenomenal challenges and special effects. Will ABC give it a second season?

Plus: an interview with the actor who played Verlox and the ogre.


Shark Tank is getting a spin-off

Shark Tank

Companies that get deals on the show will be followed for this new spin-off.

Also: Before the show began, Shark Barbara Corcoran was cast and then replaced--but then she sent this amazing e-mail and won the job.

about the writer

Andy Dehnart is a journalist who has covered reality television for more than 15 years and created reality blurred in 2000. A member of the Television Critics Association, his writing and criticism about television, culture, and media has appeared on NPR and in Playboy, Buzzfeed, and many other publications. Andy, 36, also directs the journalism program at Stetson University in Florida, where he teaches creative nonfiction and journalism. He has an M.F.A. in nonfiction writing and literature from Bennington College. More about reality blurred and Andy.