Bravo will air middle-aged Laguna Beach series The Real Housewives of Orange County

Bravo, having apparently run out of ideas, is planning to air a reality show that essentially is an adult version of Laguna Beach. Even the series’ title, The Real Housewives of Orange County, sounds familiar, as it rips off a rip-off (Laguna Beach‘s “The Real OC” tagline) of The OC, and rips off the title of a network drama (“Desperate Housewives”). Despite all this overt plagiarism, the show sounds like it could be fun.

Like the MTV show did, the Bravo series follows-up on a popular drama, Bravo’s president Bravo’s president admits.
“From Peyton Place to Desperate Housewives, viewers have been riveted by the fictionalized versions of such lifestyles on television. Now, here is a series that depicts real-life ‘desperate’ housewives with an authentic look at their compelling day-to-day drama,” Lauren Zalaznick says in a Bravo press release.

The release notes that the “series focuses on five real-life housewives living in a protected Southern California enclave, exposing the excitement, extravagance and everyday drama that exists in their unscripted and unrehearsed lives.” Those housewives–Kimberly Bryant, Jeana Keough, Vicki Gunvalson, Lauri Waring, and Jo De La Rosa, are all in their 40s, except Jo, who’s in her 20s.

The seven episode series debuts March 21.

Bravo To Launch New Original Docu-Series “The Real Housewives Of Orange County” [Bravo press release]

Review: Married at First Sight

Marriage At First Sight

In an era of Tinder and Grindr, instant acceptance or dismissal of a potential partner, or instant sex with another body, Married at First Sight offers the thrill of watching strangers deal with the very basics of relationships.

Beyond the headline-grabbing premise, the series has turned out to be a stripped-down, authentic exploration of something very interesting. Read the full review.

about the writer

Andy Dehnart is a journalist who has covered reality television for more than 15 years and created reality blurred in 2000. A member of the Television Critics Association, his writing and criticism about television, culture, and media has appeared on NPR and in Playboy, Buzzfeed, and many other publications. Andy, 36, also directs the journalism program at Stetson University in Florida, where he teaches creative nonfiction and journalism. He has an M.F.A. in nonfiction writing and literature from Bennington College. More about reality blurred and Andy.