Trump wants to stay for Apprentice 6 and 7; promises surprise for live finale

If anything, Donald Trump and company are great at keeping The Apprentice in the news. Today, he tells the New York Daily News that he expects NBC to renew the show for two more seasons past the fifth season, which is currently taping.

“I’m sure NBC will come to me and say, ‘We want to do No. 6 and No. 7. It’s a lot of work, but it’s the success that drives me. My inclination is to do it, because of the success of the show,” Trump said.

A media buyer says that NBC might actually renew the series, because it is successful by some measurements; as we learned a few days ago, rich people watch The Apprentice more than other shows. Katz Television Group’s Bill Carroll said, “When you start to analyze the performance [of 'The Apprentice'], the mistake that might be made is to not realize the quality of the viewer it provides. I would be very surprised if NBC wasn’t looking at it in a positive way.”

After having earlier blamed lower ratings on Martha Stewart’s version of the show, Trump now says that the lead-in on NBC is to blame. “If we had the same lead-in as season one, I think I’d be getting higher ratings than season one. Instead of having ‘Joey’ and whatever, I think we would have actually higher ratings,” he said.

Trump also notes that he’s the only one who’s had any success at this type of show. “We learned one thing, nobody else can do it. Not because of Martha. Tommy Hilfiger didn’t work. [Richard] Branson didn’t work. [Mark] Cuban didn’t work. There have been 14 copies of the ‘Apprentice’ that have failed. There’s only one Trump,” he said.

In addition, Trump teases us saying that he’ll surprise us at the finale, perhaps by making a rational decision.

Trump: I’ll get rehired [New York Daily News]

Review: Married at First Sight

Marriage At First Sight

In an era of Tinder and Grindr, instant acceptance or dismissal of a potential partner, or instant sex with another body, Married at First Sight offers the thrill of watching strangers deal with the very basics of relationships.

Beyond the headline-grabbing premise, the series has turned out to be a stripped-down, authentic exploration of something very interesting. Read the full review.

about the writer

Andy Dehnart is a journalist who has covered reality television for more than 15 years and created reality blurred in 2000. A member of the Television Critics Association, his writing and criticism about television, culture, and media has appeared on NPR and in Playboy, Buzzfeed, and many other publications. Andy, 36, also directs the journalism program at Stetson University in Florida, where he teaches creative nonfiction and journalism. He has an M.F.A. in nonfiction writing and literature from Bennington College. More about reality blurred and Andy.