Omarosa admits that reality TV “is a profession for” her, and surprises no one

On The Surreal Life 5, Omarosa admitted what she’s admitted many times in the past: that she’s basically become what people want her to be. “This is a profession for me now. If the world believes me to be the biggest villain in the history of reality television, so be it, and I will not disappoint,” she said, and surprised no one, except maybe the producers of the show, who expected this to be some kind of shock.

During the “Dirty Laundry” part of the show, a mock talk show hosted by Sally Jesse Raphael, the washed-up TV talk show star confronted a washed-up reality TV show star. “It pays a big check so I run with it, you know,” Omarosa said. “I am a professor, I’m researching reality television.” She later said she was working on a book.

Sally Jesse Raphael, who was so bored she couldn’t even bother to sit up straight, accused Omarosa of being fake and “scripting it,” and then confronted her with evidence. “Now, for the first time in reality television, you are going to see what Omarosa is really like between the questions” in an interview, Sally said.

“When production screws up, they fix their own crap. You got a good half-hour honey, and I’m out of here. Half-hour,” Omarosa told the producer who was interviewing her.

So, okay, if the Omarosa we see on camera acts like a bitch, and the evidence that she’s faking it is that she’s a bitch, um, what? And never mind that the camera was on the whole time, and of course Omarosa knew that, because she’s definitely not stupid. So if she’s acting, or at least playing up her bitchy side, she was doing it then, too.

A few moments later, after flubbing a sentence, Omarosa refused to follow the interview producer’s coaching. “I’m not good with my script. Can I get my line, line person?” she said, clearly being sarcastic and making fun of the producer, who responded defensively. “It’s not lines, it’s just putting it present tense or past tense,” the producer said. Then Omarosa responded, “No, honey, it’s a line,” and went on to tell the producer that she was worse than the other producer.

“We did not edit that in any way,” Sally said, and her huge reveal was flattened because Omarosa immediately agreed. “You’re absolutely right, I don’t like that producer. I don not like that producer, she’s awful.”

It was perhaps the lamest confrontation in reality television history.

What Sally should have confronted Omarosa about were her multiple claims of having “fans” and being “the biggest villain in the history of reality television.” Um, maybe a year ago, but we have short attention spans and are completely over you.

And the scariest part of the episode came later, when Bronson ran into the back yard and screamed, “Cappy!” For a moment, it seemed like the Big Brother 6 cast member was hiding behind a beach ball. But as it turns out, that’s just the unfortunate nickname Bronson uses for Caprice.

Review: Married at First Sight

Marriage At First Sight

In an era of Tinder and Grindr, instant acceptance or dismissal of a potential partner, or instant sex with another body, Married at First Sight offers the thrill of watching strangers deal with the very basics of relationships.

Beyond the headline-grabbing premise, the series has turned out to be a stripped-down, authentic exploration of something very interesting. Read the full review.

about the writer

Andy Dehnart is a journalist who has covered reality television for more than 15 years and created reality blurred in 2000. A member of the Television Critics Association, his writing and criticism about television, culture, and media has appeared on NPR and in Playboy, Buzzfeed, and many other publications. Andy, 36, also directs the journalism program at Stetson University in Florida, where he teaches creative nonfiction and journalism. He has an M.F.A. in nonfiction writing and literature from Bennington College. More about reality blurred and Andy.