Sergio wins Contender rematch in a controversial split decision

Contender champion Sergio Mora beat Peter Manfredo Jr. yet again, winning an eight-round rematch by a split decision.

As the LA Daily News reports, “Manfredo Jr. outlanded Mora 180-133, but Mora landed a higher percentage, 32 percent to 30 percent overall and 36 percent on power punches to Manfredo Jr.’s 34 percent.” ESPN runs down the fight round by round.

The Daily News notes that Manfredo “certainly looked better than he did the first time the two fought in May, but ultimately, Mora was able to draw Manfredo Jr. into confrontations on the inside, negating Manfredo’s strong jab and power punching ability.”

Mora told the paper, “I’m not going to lie, the first three rounds were competitive, I might have even given them to him,” Mora said. “I couldn’t see so I had to change my game plan. …But I won this fight. I hurt him, and he never hurt me.”

Manfredo disagrees, saying, “Yes I felt robbed. I knew I was taking a chance fighting him in his backyard but I was willing to do it but I talked to the Contender people as long as I knew I could get a fair decision. I felt I beat him in every single category.”

One of the two undercard fights also had a controversial decision; Jessie Brinkley defeated Anthony Bonsante by unanimous decision after the fight was stopped for Bonsante.

For their efforts, “Manfredo Jr., Brinkley and Bonsante each received $100,000 purses,” the Daily News reports, “while welterweight Alfonso Gomez made $75,000.”

Mora beats Manfredo by split decision [LA Daily News]

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about the writer

Andy Dehnart is a journalist who has covered reality television for more than 15 years and created reality blurred in 2000. A member of the Television Critics Association, his writing and criticism about television, culture, and media has appeared on NPR and in Playboy, Buzzfeed, and many other publications. Andy, 36, also directs the journalism program at Stetson University in Florida, where he teaches creative nonfiction and journalism. He has an M.F.A. in nonfiction writing and literature from Bennington College. More about reality blurred and Andy.