Dick Butkus walks away from his Bound for Glory fake coaching job

ESPN’s Bound for Glory, which chronicles a high school football team that is being coached by Dick Butkus, is almost halfway through its eight-episode season. But Dick Butkus has already left his job.

The description of the series says Butkus “will be their head coach for one season” and “will discipline, drive, and inspire these boys to succeed.”

Apaprently, the best way for him to do that was to quit with two games left to go. Butkus “left Saturday, one day after Montour’s record dropped to 1-6 with a 34-3 loss,” the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette reports.

According to the Post-Gazette, he “told Montour’s ‘real’ head coach he was leaving because he had fulfilled his contract for the show.” Lou Cerro, Montour’s head coach, said, “He basically told me two weeks ago that he was going to be out of here. He said he was contracted to work only eight weeks.” The real coach, who always remained in control of the team despite the series’ premise, suggested money was an issue. “They’re telling us that to do the final two weeks of the season would cost them between $1.5 million and $2 million,” he said.

ESPN will keep a single camera crew there for practices and the final two games, although it’s unclear whether or not Butkus’ quitting will be featured on the series.

The fourth episode airs tonight at 10 p.m. ET on ESPN.

Butkus leaves Montour [Pittsburgh Post-Gazette]
Bound for Glory [ESPN]

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Andy Dehnart is a journalist who has covered reality television for more than 15 years and created reality blurred in 2000. A member of the Television Critics Association, his writing and criticism about television, culture, and media has appeared on NPR and in Playboy, Buzzfeed, and many other publications. Andy, 36, also directs the journalism program at Stetson University in Florida, where he teaches creative nonfiction and journalism. He has an M.F.A. in nonfiction writing and literature from Bennington College. More about reality blurred and Andy.