MTV’s Run’s House continues tonight; Miss Seventeen’s debut repeats tonight

Although MTV’s latest reality series, the meta-titled The Reality Show, apparently was bumped off MTV only to burn off its episodes online, the network continues to produce new reality series. Two have debuted over the past week.

Run’s House follows Run-D.M.C.’s Joseph “Run” Simmons, who’s a minister and a business owner. He’s also a father of five children, and thus the series is sort of like what The Osbournes would have been if Ozzy was coherent and the kids were younger. The two youngest, Diggy and Russell, wreak the most havoc, but the family is almost too functional for a reality series, never mind one that follows a celebrity. Perhaps this is the birth of a new subgenre, one that’s not quite as manic or absurd as other celebrity-focused series.

Run’s House airs on Thursdays at 10:30 p.m. ET; the first episode repeats today at 2:30.

Miss Seventeen follows 17 young women competing for a cover and an internship at Seventeen magazine, so it’s kind of like The Apprentice meets America’s Next Top Model for teenage girls. In the Trump/Tyra role is Atoosa Rubenstein, Seventeen’s editor-in-chief. The show was Rubenstein’s idea, and she talks about that in an interview with the New York Observer this week. Of the effects of her new series, she says, “I feel like a D-list reality star.”

Miss Seventeen airs Mondays at 10:30 p.m., and repeats today at 11 p.m.

Run’s House and Miss Seventeen [MTV]

The Sing-Off loses its star

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NBC's super-fun December a capella singing competition The Sing-Off is returning, but without its star judge, Ben Folds, and only as a two-hour special. Those are really depressing changes for a series that proved itself to be a super-fun show when it returned last December.


A film director talks about becoming a reality TV character

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What is it like to have your life turned into reality TV? Director Anna Martemucci, one of the two directors featured on Starz' exceptional reality series, talks about that, the competition, and her collaboration with her husband and brother-in-law.

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about the writer

Andy Dehnart is a journalist who has covered reality television for more than 15 years and created reality blurred in 2000. A member of the Television Critics Association, his writing and criticism about television, culture, and media has appeared on NPR and in Playboy, Buzzfeed, and many other publications. Andy, 36, also directs the journalism program at Stetson University in Florida, where he teaches creative nonfiction and journalism. He has an M.F.A. in nonfiction writing and literature from Bennington College. More about reality blurred and Andy.