J.D. wears “Go Fuck Your Self” t-shirt on Rock Star

One of the four remaining contestants on CBS’ Rock Star: INXS wore a t-shirt on the show that appeared to be a series of Asian characters. J.D., who is generally fond of wearing shirts that have malfunctioning buttons, wore the shirt during week eight, and it appeared to be innocuous. But anyone who tilted their head to the right while looking at him saw that the shirt clearly read “Go Fuck Your Self.”

The shirt was originally spotted by blogger Tian, and as Adrants points out, “Censors did not catch the trick and images of the contestant are all over the Rockstar INXS website (as we figured, CBS has removed the images) and, presumably, were broadcast as well.” Adrants has preserved images of the shirt from CBS’ photo gallery.

As the competition enters its final weeks, The Chicago Tribune’s Karen Budell went to LA and reports on the “Ten things we learned when attending a taping of the show at CBS Studios in L.A.” Among them: the “contestants have to wake up around 4:30 a.m. for the taping of Wednesday elimination shows in order to choose their outfit, go through hair and makeup, practice, do sound checks, etc.”

How will the final three contestants know what INXS songs they have to sing? They “learn the back catalog in preparation of whatever song the band throws their way; they then have about 30 seconds until the band starts playing,” the Tribune reports.

‘Rockstar’ Contestant Slips Expletive Past CBS Censors [Adrants]
Inside “Rock Star: INXS” [Chicago Tribune]

Review: Married at First Sight

Marriage At First Sight

In an era of Tinder and Grindr, instant acceptance or dismissal of a potential partner, or instant sex with another body, Married at First Sight offers the thrill of watching strangers deal with the very basics of relationships.

Beyond the headline-grabbing premise, the series has turned out to be a stripped-down, authentic exploration of something very interesting. Read the full review.

about the writer

Andy Dehnart is a journalist who has covered reality television for more than 15 years and created reality blurred in 2000. A member of the Television Critics Association, his writing and criticism about television, culture, and media has appeared on NPR and in Playboy, Buzzfeed, and many other publications. Andy, 36, also directs the journalism program at Stetson University in Florida, where he teaches creative nonfiction and journalism. He has an M.F.A. in nonfiction writing and literature from Bennington College. More about reality blurred and Andy.