Janice Dickinson says she was fired from Top Model, explains why she’s not promoting The Surreal Life

In an interview with Radar, Janice Dickinson clarifies her earlier remarks that she quit America’s Next Top Model over a dispute about money. Previously, she told the New York Times, “I think I was asking for too much.”

In this new interview, she confirms that she didn’t really quit, as was reported. Instead, she says, “I got fired,” and says it’s because she “was just telling the truth and I was saving these girls from going out there and being told that they’re too short, too fat, their skin’s not good enough.”

As you might expect, this didn’t make her happy. She says,

“I’d rather be an honest bitch than some ass-kissing, sugarcoating, namby-pamby, wiping-ass motherfucker. I made the show number one in 52 countries. And then I got the sack, and the UPN executives replaced me with Twiggy. No one in America knows who Twiggy is. There’s no way anyone could fill my shoes. There’s no way.”

On her way out, Janice sets fire to every bridge she can, saying, among other things, that “Tyra’s no walk in the park. Tyra’s really righteous.”

By the way, she also calls her Surreal Life co-star Balki “a gimp motherfucker,” and says that, on the upcoming

“last episode, there was this blowout and none of the cast members stuck up for me. None of them had any backbone as far as I’m concerned. Well you know what? Fuck you all, then! [Glares at the VH1 publicist] They’re pissed that I’m not promoting the show here, but I don’t give a shit. I don’t care. They don’t pay well at all for publicity–there were no meals, nothing’s comped.”

Sounds like someone woke up on the wrong side of her coffin this morning.

America’s Craziest Ex-Model [Radar Online]

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about the writer

Andy Dehnart is a journalist who has covered reality television for more than 15 years and created reality blurred in 2000. A member of the Television Critics Association, his writing and criticism about television, culture, and media has appeared on NPR and in Playboy, Buzzfeed, and many other publications. Andy, 36, also directs the journalism program at Stetson University in Florida, where he teaches creative nonfiction and journalism. He has an M.F.A. in nonfiction writing and literature from Bennington College. More about reality blurred and Andy.