Martha reveals her theme song, first task

Judging by the rate at which we’re receiving information about The Apprentice: Martha Stewart, we should know who won by the time it debuts. Yesterday, Martha appeared before TV critics, and revealed two more things about her reality show: its theme song and first task. If you consider these things spoilers, stop reading now.

Replacing the O’Jays’ “For Love of Money” is “Sweet Dreams” by the Eurythmics. As the New York Times reports, “The song includes such lines as ‘everyone is looking for something’ and ‘I’m gonna know what’s inside you.’ Mr. [Mark] Burnett said Ms. Stewart was a big fan of the Eurythmics lead singer, Annie Lennox.”

The teams’ first task will be mentally and physically challenging: Mark “Burnett said the first challenge requires each team to modernize a classic fairy tale — ‘Jack and the Beanstalk’ for one team, ‘Hansel and Gretel’ for the other — and test each on children,” TV Week reports. Not to be cynical, but that sounds like a challenge produced by someone who was fired from Big Brother 6‘s challenge department.

Issues of Past Not Off Limits in TV Return, Stewart Says [The New York Times]
Stewart Previews ‘Martha,’ ‘Apprentice’ for Press [TV Week]

The Sing-Off loses its star

Ben Folds

NBC's super-fun December a capella singing competition The Sing-Off is returning, but without its star judge, Ben Folds, and only as a two-hour special. Those are really depressing changes for a series that proved itself to be a super-fun show when it returned last December.


A film director talks about becoming a reality TV character

Anna Martemucci

What is it like to have your life turned into reality TV? Director Anna Martemucci, one of the two directors featured on Starz' exceptional reality series, talks about that, the competition, and her collaboration with her husband and brother-in-law.

Plus: How the show's producers tried to keep the $250,000 competition fair.

about the writer

Andy Dehnart is a journalist who has covered reality television for more than 15 years and created reality blurred in 2000. A member of the Television Critics Association, his writing and criticism about television, culture, and media has appeared on NPR and in Playboy, Buzzfeed, and many other publications. Andy, 36, also directs the journalism program at Stetson University in Florida, where he teaches creative nonfiction and journalism. He has an M.F.A. in nonfiction writing and literature from Bennington College. More about reality blurred and Andy.