CBS considering rescheduling Rock Star: INXS; Mark Burnett says he’s held “to a different standard”

The relative failure of Mark Burnett’s Rock Star: INXS has CBS “seriously weighing scheduling changes related to the series,” in part because “the show is performing worse on many nights than the re-runs CBS aired in the time slots a year ago,” the Wall Street Journal reports.

Mark Burnett admits the show isn’t doing well, but says he’s being treated unfairly. “Am I disappointed? Yes. But when you’ve had the level of success that I’ve had, people hold you to a different standard. Nobody bats a thousand in this business,” he told the paper.

The WSJ says “some senior network executives complain that Mr. Burnett has stretched himself too thin. While giving him credit for trying risky projects, these people also grouse that the former British paratrooper has grown so powerful that he ignores suggestions of how to improve struggling shows.”

Burnett, of course, dismisses that: “That’s ridiculous. Networks keep buying my shows because they know at the very least I deliver outstanding quality.”

By the way, Rock Star: INXS has been expensive for CBS. The WSJ says “the 38 episodes will cost in the neighborhood of $50 million to produce, say network executives familiar with its pricing.”

Is the Reality Show King Losing His Touch? [Wall Street Journal]

Frankie leads Big Brother's parade of delusion

Frankie on Big Brother

Heading into the finale, the delusion continues, with a re-appearance by evicted Frankie.

Related: The unwatchable cast of Fox's Utopia keeps yelling and screaming.


Shark Tank is getting a spin-off

Shark Tank

Companies that get deals on the show will be followed for this new spin-off.

Also: Before the show began, Shark Barbara Corcoran was cast and then replaced--but then she sent this amazing e-mail and won the job.

about the writer

Andy Dehnart is a journalist who has covered reality television for more than 15 years and created reality blurred in 2000. A member of the Television Critics Association, his writing and criticism about television, culture, and media has appeared on NPR and in Playboy, Buzzfeed, and many other publications. Andy, 36, also directs the journalism program at Stetson University in Florida, where he teaches creative nonfiction and journalism. He has an M.F.A. in nonfiction writing and literature from Bennington College. More about reality blurred and Andy.