Beau nominates Howie and Rachel

Okay, Big Brother 6 has officially reached its boring stage. Perhaps it’s that each group is just going after the other, or perhaps it’s that, without Kaysar, all hope is lost. Either way, the makers of Sominex might be forced to sue for unfair competition if this keeps up.

With the assistance of God, who was apparently unoccupied, Head of Household Beau decided to nominate Howie and Rachel. He said his decision was “75 percent strategic and 25 percent personal.” James won the power of veto yet again, and chose not to use it. (There was controversy surrounding his win; he didn’t remove the ropes from two of the floating faces, but apparently the producers let his win stand anyway. And none of that made the episode.) Safe once again, James takes another step closer to victory.

About the only other notable thing that happened was the Friendship sailed back into the Head of Household bedroom, where the showed themselves to be truly psychologically damaged by their experience
so far. Beau kept referring to everything in the first person plural (“Whenever any of us get our HOH,” he said), and the first thing the Friendship did in the HOH bedroom was reconstruct their shrine to their fallen, beloved leader Cappy. “Our group is solid,” Beau said. Yes, solid and insane.

The highlight of the episode, though, was when Ivette said Rachel had a “stupid horse face,” which is sort of like Fraggle Rock’s Trash Heap saying that someone’s face looks like garbage.

Bo-Bo on the Go-Go [CBS]

Review: Married at First Sight

Marriage At First Sight

In an era of Tinder and Grindr, instant acceptance or dismissal of a potential partner, or instant sex with another body, Married at First Sight offers the thrill of watching strangers deal with the very basics of relationships.

Beyond the headline-grabbing premise, the series has turned out to be a stripped-down, authentic exploration of something very interesting. Read the full review.

about the writer

Andy Dehnart is a journalist who has covered reality television for more than 15 years and created reality blurred in 2000. A member of the Television Critics Association, his writing and criticism about television, culture, and media has appeared on NPR and in Playboy, Buzzfeed, and many other publications. Andy, 36, also directs the journalism program at Stetson University in Florida, where he teaches creative nonfiction and journalism. He has an M.F.A. in nonfiction writing and literature from Bennington College. More about reality blurred and Andy.