Did Big Brother producers ignore their rules by keeping Eric and Michael in the house after Saturday’s fight?

JAM! Showbiz’s John Powell is on the story of the Saturday night fight in the Big Brother 6 house, and he explains it all with just seven words: “After the players were given some alcohol….”

Powell notes that “anyone making verbal or physical threats against another player can immediately be removed from the house and disqualified from the game.” But they’re both still in the house. The next morning, Eric said, “My actions in throwing the chair back was deemed a threat. It still wasn’t right by me. It is over and I am glad I am still here.”

Powell notes that “it appears [producers] have given him and Michael a second chance.” Eric said, “I would never strike another man. I gotta say the producers have everyone’s interest at heart. If everyone wasn’t safe with me being in the house, I would have packed up my stuff and left.”

The producers also apparently convinced Michael to stay, even though he wanted to leave. Powell says “the HouseGuests spoke about Michael wanting to leave the house but the producers convincing him to give the idea some thought.”

Tempers erupt on ‘Big Brother’ feeds [JAM! Showbiz]

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about the writer

Andy Dehnart is a journalist who has covered reality television for more than 15 years and created reality blurred in 2000. A member of the Television Critics Association, his writing and criticism about television, culture, and media has appeared on NPR and in Playboy, Buzzfeed, and many other publications. Andy, 36, also directs the journalism program at Stetson University in Florida, where he teaches creative nonfiction and journalism. He has an M.F.A. in nonfiction writing and literature from Bennington College. More about reality blurred and Andy.