Fox Reality exec says he didn’t call the Swan “worthless”

Fox Reality Channel’s David Lyle writes to reality blurred about comments he made about The Swan, as reported by the Calagary Sun. He corrects the record, noting that he didn’t say it was “worthless,” as he’s looking forward to seeing the follow-up segments. Lyle writes,

I swear I didn’t say The Swan was “a worthless piece of television”. I hope I would never be that pompous. I liked The Swan. It is true that sometimes we did turn them out to look like….err…well, lets be honest about those breast implants, hookers isn’t a million miles from the truth. The part that said I couldn’t wait to see them now is correct. I can’t wait to see how two years or more has changed the lives of the women who were in the first series of The Swan. I think it will be a fantastic chance to see if the people who put themselves through Reality TV makeovers get everything they think they will get. With The Swan, the creator, Nely Galan had whole lots of other makeover things going on that didn’t dwell exclusively with the physical and I will be fascinated to see how that self help side of the transformation has survived….or not.

God bless The Swan….never worthless.

The Swan will begin reairing–with the new footage–on Fox Reality Channel sometime this fall.

earlier:
Swan producer calls the show “worthless,” says its cast “[looked] like cheap hookers” [reality blurred]

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about the writer

Andy Dehnart is a journalist who has covered reality television for more than 15 years and created reality blurred in 2000. A member of the Television Critics Association, his writing and criticism about television, culture, and media has appeared on NPR and in Playboy, Buzzfeed, and many other publications. Andy, 36, also directs the journalism program at Stetson University in Florida, where he teaches creative nonfiction and journalism. He has an M.F.A. in nonfiction writing and literature from Bennington College. More about reality blurred and Andy.