Real Gilligan professor “could face misdemeanor criminal charges” for misrepresenting himself

Reality TV stars — or producers — creatively stretching the truth about a cast member’s profession is nothing new. But the most recent example could result in criminal charges.

The Real Gilligan’s Island 2‘s victorious Professor Tiy-E Muhammad, “is not licensed to practice psychology in Georgia or anywhere else,” despite being identified as a psychologist on head shots and elsewhere, according to the Atlanta Journal-Constitution. Tiy-E, who is “known as ‘The Love Doctor’ on a local [Atlanta] radio station, could face misdemeanor criminal charges” because “[c]laiming you are a psychologist without a license is illegal.”

There are other problems with his resume. His web site bio says “he stepped out on faith, and resigned from his position as a professor of Psychology at Clark, to pursue a career in acting and modeling.” But the AJC reports that “[s]chool officials said he left after they discovered his credentials were bogus.”

What does Tiy-E have to say about this? “That is not anybody’s business,” he told reporters. The AJC also discovered that while “Muhammad said that in 1999 he founded a nonprofit organization called ‘Man II Man Inc.,’ … the organization is a for-profit company, said Cara Hodgson of the secretary of state’s office.”

After he was asked about that, Tiy-E “said he had not ‘filed the paperwork’ to make the corporation nonprofit,” and then “On Tuesday, the Web site was changed to describe the organization as ‘community-based,’ rather than nonprofit.”

Just sit right back and you’ll hear … the truth [Atlanta Journal-Constitution]

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about the writer

Andy Dehnart is a journalist who has covered reality television for more than 15 years and created reality blurred in 2000. A member of the Television Critics Association, his writing and criticism about television, culture, and media has appeared on NPR and in Playboy, Buzzfeed, and many other publications. Andy, 36, also directs the journalism program at Stetson University in Florida, where he teaches creative nonfiction and journalism. He has an M.F.A. in nonfiction writing and literature from Bennington College. More about reality blurred and Andy.