Corey Clark says he and his Idol “supporters have agreed to participate in a Fox probe.”

Just eight days before the release of his self-titled album, Corey Clark’s people have issued another press release, announcing that he’s reversed his decision to refuse help. Previously, he told FOX to go f themselves, saying he’d only help the government investigate.

But since the government has better things to do, Corey “has agreed to step forward and offer Fox executives his full compliance and participation in a fair and thorough examination,” the press release says. Tantalizingly, it also suggests that his American Idol 2 castmates are also behind him. The release says that “several other former AI season 2 finalists” are also willing to help. But the next sentence is cleverly worded and gets less specific. From the release:

“All of Clark’s season 2 supporters have agreed to participate in a Fox probe if it (Fox) actually follows through with its very public promise to investigate.”

Not surprisingly, the press release does not mention who his “season 2 supporters” actually are. His parents? His record label? Homeless people giving hand jobs for crack? Later, Corey suggests that some are actual contestants: “It is painfully clear that unless my fellow AI season 2 contestants and I are directly involved with Fox executives during the investigation, we will never know if an investigation ever really took place.” Again, though, he doesn’t offer names.

Former American Idol Finalists Support Corey Clark’s Request for Thorough Investigation [PRNewswire]
Corey Clark [Amazon]

The Sing-Off loses its star

Ben Folds

NBC's super-fun December a capella singing competition The Sing-Off is returning, but without its star judge, Ben Folds, and only as a two-hour special. Those are really depressing changes for a series that proved itself to be a super-fun show when it returned last December.


A film director talks about becoming a reality TV character

Anna Martemucci

What is it like to have your life turned into reality TV? Director Anna Martemucci, one of the two directors featured on Starz' exceptional reality series, talks about that, the competition, and her collaboration with her husband and brother-in-law.

Plus: How the show's producers tried to keep the $250,000 competition fair.

about the writer

Andy Dehnart is a journalist who has covered reality television for more than 15 years and created reality blurred in 2000. A member of the Television Critics Association, his writing and criticism about television, culture, and media has appeared on NPR and in Playboy, Buzzfeed, and many other publications. Andy, 36, also directs the journalism program at Stetson University in Florida, where he teaches creative nonfiction and journalism. He has an M.F.A. in nonfiction writing and literature from Bennington College. More about reality blurred and Andy.