Mark Cuban responds to Trump’s rant.

Mark Cuban responds to Trump’s rant.
During last week’s Apprentice 3 boardroom, Donald Trump took a moment to slam his fellow billionaire reality show hosts. He said, “Branson went after me, I killed him. Cuban went after me, I killed him.” He was referring to Richard Branson and Mark Cuban, who hosted ABC’s The Benefactor. On Friday, the New York Post talked to Cuban and reported that he said, “Donald needs to stop drinking his own Kool-Aid. He’s getting sick on himself!” But the Post mysteriously added that Cuban “offered an off-color response that was partially unprintable.” This, of course, intrigued me, so last weekend I asked Mark Cuban what he’d said. His reply:

I basically laughed and told him I must be in Donald’s head so much that he had gotten sick on himself from drinking the kool-aid, peeing in a cup and drinking it again. He keeps on talking about me in interviews when I don’t give a shit what he says or does.

Funny, but “peeing in a cub and drinking it again”–that was “unprintable”? Old media is so lame sometimes.

+ also: Mark Cuban says Trump “needs to step away from the Cialis. Those 4 hour erections have started to have an impact on his thinking.”

The Sing-Off loses its star

Ben Folds

NBC's super-fun December a capella singing competition The Sing-Off is returning, but without its star judge, Ben Folds, and only as a two-hour special. Those are really depressing changes for a series that proved itself to be a super-fun show when it returned last December.


A film director talks about becoming a reality TV character

Anna Martemucci

What is it like to have your life turned into reality TV? Director Anna Martemucci, one of the two directors featured on Starz' exceptional reality series, talks about that, the competition, and her collaboration with her husband and brother-in-law.

Plus: How the show's producers tried to keep the $250,000 competition fair.

about the writer

Andy Dehnart is a journalist who has covered reality television for more than 15 years and created reality blurred in 2000. A member of the Television Critics Association, his writing and criticism about television, culture, and media has appeared on NPR and in Playboy, Buzzfeed, and many other publications. Andy, 36, also directs the journalism program at Stetson University in Florida, where he teaches creative nonfiction and journalism. He has an M.F.A. in nonfiction writing and literature from Bennington College. More about reality blurred and Andy.