Starting Over may do season with men; Rhonda Britten offers advice for being cast.

Starting Over may do season with men; Rhonda Britten offers advice for being cast.
Starting Over may do a house with men in it, Life Coach Rhonda Britten told 500 middle-aged women and me at the Florida Mall in Orlando Saturday. (Oh, I kid the show’s fans; they were, for real, a diverse group.) Rhonda said, “we are contemplating a house for men. I don’t know if it’s going to be this season or next.” That’s in addition to the third-season episodes that will focus on couples (“married, engaged, dating, same-sex, common-law, etc.”), who are currently being cast. Rhonda also offered advice to those who want to be cast for the show:

  • “Have a goal.” She said “they’re not going to pick you” unless you have a concrete reason for doing the series.
  • If a cast member with your same issues or problems has previously appeared on the series, “make sure you have a different angle,” she said, because they won’t do the same story twice.
  • You should “make sure it [your story] includes other people.”
  • “Make sure you’re authentic and share yourself–be you.”

Rhonda also said that “something really big’s about to happen to Andy” Paige from season one, and suggested fans sign up for announcements on Andy’s web site. She also said that Cassie is moving in with Maureen (“Maureen’s kind of mothering her, which she needs”). Finally, she said that, if there’s anything fans want, they should “go to the message boards and ask for it.” Producers “read every single one of those” posts in the producers thread, so requests–like a house for men–will be heard there.

Review: Married at First Sight

Marriage At First Sight

In an era of Tinder and Grindr, instant acceptance or dismissal of a potential partner, or instant sex with another body, Married at First Sight offers the thrill of watching strangers deal with the very basics of relationships.

Beyond the headline-grabbing premise, the series has turned out to be a stripped-down, authentic exploration of something very interesting. Read the full review.

about the writer

Andy Dehnart is a journalist who has covered reality television for more than 15 years and created reality blurred in 2000. A member of the Television Critics Association, his writing and criticism about television, culture, and media has appeared on NPR and in Playboy, Buzzfeed, and many other publications. Andy, 36, also directs the journalism program at Stetson University in Florida, where he teaches creative nonfiction and journalism. He has an M.F.A. in nonfiction writing and literature from Bennington College. More about reality blurred and Andy.