actors say: stay away from reality TV.

actors say: stay away from reality TV.
Actors who’ve done reality TV to help further their careers tell other aspiring actors to stay away from reality television. To those actors, we say: Thank you. Backstage.com talked to three actors, including Boy Meets Boy‘s James Getzlaff, and finds that they regret their decisions, even if it helped their careers. James says, “My advice to actors is do not do reality TV. The success stories are very few, and transitioning the experience into something good is rare. I was fortunate, but I still think there’s a stigma attached to appearing on reality TV.” He says that “appearing on ‘Boy Meets Boy’ was much more of a door opener than I had anticipated. But I’m not sure I would appear on a reality TV show again. I can’t say I definitely wouldn’t, but I’d certainly be wiser in what I’d choose to appear on. I might do something like ‘Survivor’ or ‘Amazing Race.’ They’re competitions. Unlike ‘Boy Meets Boy’ and so many of the other reality shows, they’re not inherently about manipulation and humiliation.” Cupid‘s Paul Stancato says he “would not do another reality TV show. It’s not acting. Although in hindsight, I would play it much bigger than I did, make more of an effort to be funny. I was very cautious and that was a mistake. Reality TV shows may be good for standup comics who have large presences all by themselves.”

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John Rocker

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Why Dick Donato left Big Brother 13

Dick Donato

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about the writer

Andy Dehnart is a journalist who has covered reality television for more than 15 years and created reality blurred in 2000. A member of the Television Critics Association, his writing and criticism about television, culture, and media has appeared on NPR and in Playboy, Buzzfeed, and many other publications. Andy, 36, also directs the journalism program at Stetson University in Florida, where he teaches creative nonfiction and journalism. He has an M.F.A. in nonfiction writing and literature from Bennington College. More about reality blurred and Andy.