ABC wants Michael Schiavo to be the next Bachelor, which could air soon.

This post is part of the satiricial April 1, 2005 edition.

ABC wants Michael Schiavo to be the next Bachelor, which could air soon.
ABC has contacted Michael Schiavo’s lawyers, trying to negotiate an appearance on the network’s Bachelor franchise. Speaking on condition of anonymity, an ABC entertainment division exec said, “Along with all other media outlets, opportunistic Republican and Democratic politicians, and hypocrites of all flavors, our news division has already exploited Michael, his wife, her family, and this whole tragic situation, so why shouldn’t we?” The network is hoping to start filming the series as soon as possible, and may even shorten the current season to get the new series to air faster. The exec said, “Everyone knows him right now. It just sucks we cast this unknown dolt Charlie O’Connell for this season.” When asked to respond to reports, a PR person said, “Silly blogger, we only give out info when we have some piece of crap to promote.” A media buyer expressed hope for this new season, saying, “ABC’s utter incompetence when it comes to reality series has left The Bachelor on the reality TV version of a feeding tube, so this makes perfect sense.”

The Sing-Off loses its star

Ben Folds

NBC's super-fun December a capella singing competition The Sing-Off is returning, but without its star judge, Ben Folds, and only as a two-hour special. Those are really depressing changes for a series that proved itself to be a super-fun show when it returned last December.


A film director talks about becoming a reality TV character

Anna Martemucci

What is it like to have your life turned into reality TV? Director Anna Martemucci, one of the two directors featured on Starz' exceptional reality series, talks about that, the competition, and her collaboration with her husband and brother-in-law.

Plus: How the show's producers tried to keep the $250,000 competition fair.

about the writer

Andy Dehnart is a journalist who has covered reality television for more than 15 years and created reality blurred in 2000. A member of the Television Critics Association, his writing and criticism about television, culture, and media has appeared on NPR and in Playboy, Buzzfeed, and many other publications. Andy, 36, also directs the journalism program at Stetson University in Florida, where he teaches creative nonfiction and journalism. He has an M.F.A. in nonfiction writing and literature from Bennington College. More about reality blurred and Andy.