Patrick says “we could hear on the walkie-talkies that” other teams were ahead.

Patrick says “we could hear on the walkie-talkies that” other teams were ahead.
Generally, the only rule on The Amazing Race is “never give up.” Many teams have insisted they were in last place, only to find that they were not. So watching Patrick essentially give up on this week’s episode of The Amazing Race 7 seemed like another example of premature quitting. But Patrick’s pessimism was backed by evidence we didn’t see, he tells TV Guide. While waiting for a new boat, he says “we could hear on the walkie-talkies that they had found their clues and were on their way to the pit stop.” He doesn’t specify whose walkie-talkies these were–productions or the boat crews’–but clearly they knew how everyone else was doing. Additionally, Patrick says they waited two hours for a cab and “were even thinking that we’d have to get a hostel and check into the pit stop in the morning.” Patrick also tells us why he hates Survivor‘s Rob so much: He says when he saw them, “I was so annoyed because I love the show and I was like ‘Oh, my god, The Amazing Race is jumping the shark!'” He says it was great that, during the roadblock, Rob “got beat by two gay guys and a girl! [Yet] they’re giving him credit for playing the game like Survivor. It’s annoying, but there are a lot of people with their noses up Rob and Amber’s buttholes. But that’s cool–that’s what happens to media whores.”

The Quest ends its journey stronger than it began

Verlox from The Quest

A review of the finale of summer's best reality series, which wasn't always perfect but was thoroughly entertaining right down to the finish, which included phenomenal challenges and special effects. Will ABC give it a second season?

Plus: an interview with the actor who played Verlox and the ogre.


Shark Tank is getting a spin-off

Shark Tank

Companies that get deals on the show will be followed for this new spin-off.

Also: Before the show began, Shark Barbara Corcoran was cast and then replaced--but then she sent this amazing e-mail and won the job.

about the writer

Andy Dehnart is a journalist who has covered reality television for more than 15 years and created reality blurred in 2000. A member of the Television Critics Association, his writing and criticism about television, culture, and media has appeared on NPR and in Playboy, Buzzfeed, and many other publications. Andy, 36, also directs the journalism program at Stetson University in Florida, where he teaches creative nonfiction and journalism. He has an M.F.A. in nonfiction writing and literature from Bennington College. More about reality blurred and Andy.