Kendra says her “breeding” comment was “taken out of context” by the editors.

Kendra says her “breeding” comment was “taken out of context” by the editors.
Reality TV show editors must really hate all the blame that gets flung at them by idiot reality TV show contestants. The latest example: Amazing Race 6 winner Kendra Bentley. For example, in Senegal, which she called “ghetto Africa,” she said, “This country is wretched and disgusting. And they just keep breeding and breeding in this poverty. I just can’t take it.” And upon arriving in Ethiopia, Kendra complained, “It’s Ethiopia. It’s going to be depressing, and Third World. We just went to a Third World country.” Of course, these sentences were, she tells TV Guide,

“taken out of context. I was actually talking about the government and how they put people in these situations. They don’t give them opportunities for education or birth control. I think everyone should have the same opportunities that we do in America, but there are a lot of corrupt governments in the world and it’s heartbreaking to see the [effects of that]. I was actually voicing my passion and anger toward the government, and it made it sound like I was being insensitive toward the people, which couldn’t be further from the truth.

We stand corrected; the secretary general of the UN will certainly be calling her soon to serve as a special envoy to help fight those oppressive governments.
+ also: Freddy and Kendra plan to give some of their $1 million to charity. Seriously.

The Sing-Off loses its star

Ben Folds

NBC's super-fun December a capella singing competition The Sing-Off is returning, but without its star judge, Ben Folds, and only as a two-hour special. Those are really depressing changes for a series that proved itself to be a super-fun show when it returned last December.


A film director talks about becoming a reality TV character

Anna Martemucci

What is it like to have your life turned into reality TV? Director Anna Martemucci, one of the two directors featured on Starz' exceptional reality series, talks about that, the competition, and her collaboration with her husband and brother-in-law.

Plus: How the show's producers tried to keep the $250,000 competition fair.

about the writer

Andy Dehnart is a journalist who has covered reality television for more than 15 years and created reality blurred in 2000. A member of the Television Critics Association, his writing and criticism about television, culture, and media has appeared on NPR and in Playboy, Buzzfeed, and many other publications. Andy, 36, also directs the journalism program at Stetson University in Florida, where he teaches creative nonfiction and journalism. He has an M.F.A. in nonfiction writing and literature from Bennington College. More about reality blurred and Andy.