printer ends business relationship with Reichen after discovering Reichen’s gay.

printer ends business relationship with Reichen after discovering Reichen’s gay.
The printer that produces posters featuring Amazing Race 4 winner Reichen Lehmkuhl, and that Reichen sells on his web site, has decided to end their business relationship because he discovered that Reichen is gay. In a letter to Reichen, Mark Jones wrote, “I can not continue to help promote a homosexual community, lifestyle, or individual.” Of course, when he thought Reichen was straight, he had no problems printing the poster, which features a wet Reichen pulling down his wet suit to a TV-14 level. Jones, whose company is ironically named Progressive Ventures, explained, “I learned you are a homosexual, and your web-site is helping to promote a homosexual lifestyle. Not only in adults, but in underage children as well.” He ends the letter with this: “I hope you will examine yourself from a moral standpoint.” Reichen tells The Advocate (via Timmy Ray), “It’s not even so much the lawsuit that matters, it’s that this person is creating hate and obviously teaching his children hate. And unfortunately for him it’s going to come back to haunt him, and it’s going to have nothing to do with a lawsuit or anybody even on this planet. Because karma’s a bitch.”

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about the writer

Andy Dehnart is a journalist who has covered reality television for more than 15 years and created reality blurred in 2000. A member of the Television Critics Association, his writing and criticism about television, culture, and media has appeared on NPR and in Playboy, Buzzfeed, and many other publications. Andy, 36, also directs the journalism program at Stetson University in Florida, where he teaches creative nonfiction and journalism. He has an M.F.A. in nonfiction writing and literature from Bennington College. More about reality blurred and Andy.