Jonathan: “the shove in Berlin was wrong”; Victoria: “We don’t fight like that.”

Jonathan: “the shove in Berlin was wrong”; Victoria: “We don’t fight like that.”
Unless something really important happens, or unless some nitwit casts them for an all-star Amazing Race, I promise that this is the last time I’ll post about Jonathan and Victoria. Because, to be honest, I hate them both so … much … the flames, flames, on the side of my face…

Anyway, now that they’ve been eliminated from The Amazing Race 6, I have no reason to care. In an extended interview with TV Guide, the couple address all of our burning questions (yes, they’re still together; yes, Jonathan is pure evil in human form), and Jonathan remembers to repeat most of the excuses, although he has forgotten about the stress and medication one. Maybe most significantly, Jonathan says that “[t]he shove in Berlin was wrong. It was wrong and I should not have done it. I can’t apologize any more because I really felt that it hurt.” He doesn’t really apologize any more, but does blame the editing (“If we gave them 200 percent, why did they have to use 200 percent? They could have used 180 percent.”) and his persona (“We went into this knowing we were going to be the villains, so I almost gave myself permission to be bad.”), and also compares himself to Colin and Christie.

For her part, Victoria also blames the editing (“I shrugged it off a lot, and I also gave it back to him a lot. They didn’t always show me telling him ‘Get away from me’ or ‘Back off’ or just defending myself.”) Of the shove, she says “that moment in Berlin was a heavy moment for us, and probably one of the most dramatic moments in our relationship. We don’t fight like that; we’re not physical with each other. So having the worst moment of your relationship aired on national television was pretty tough.”

In the Providence Journal, J-dog comes up with a new way of framing his excuses, and this one is incredible: “It was CBS who pointed the gun at Victoria” and “took no responsibility for what it showed.” The paper reports that “the couple alleged it [CBS] also actively worked to bring about such incidents. The show subjects contestants to unrelenting stress.” Victoria says, “We knew we were going to give the other teams a hard time and shake things up. We didn’t know they were going to put such a negative spin on our relationship.” And Victoria also blames the network, noting that because a camera was visible in the shoving shot, “It shows this decision had to go way up the line.”

+ plus: the couple will be back on CBS primetime with their own Dr. Phil special in February.

Surprisingly, man not eaten alive on Eaten Alive

Eaten Alive

Discovery Channel’s happy family holiday special Eaten Alive aired Sunday, rewarding viewers for their two full hours of viewing by ensuring that they spent quality time in the company of others instead of wasting that time doing something else that might not have been as satisfying, such as buying things that have labels which accurately reflect their contents.


Winter 2015 reality TV debut schedule

winter 2015 reality TV schedule

Mark your calendars with all these upcoming reality TV show debuts, including Celebrity Apprentice, The Bachelor, and another season of MasterChef Junior, all of which kick off in early January.

There are also 20+ shows debuting in December--including the one-off return of The Sing Off. No winter break for reality TV.

about the writer

Andy Dehnart is a journalist who has covered reality television for more than 15 years and created reality blurred in 2000. A member of the Television Critics Association, his writing and criticism about television, culture, and media has appeared on NPR and in Playboy, Buzzfeed, and many other publications. Andy, 36, also directs the journalism program at Stetson University in Florida, where he teaches creative nonfiction and journalism. He has an M.F.A. in nonfiction writing and literature from Bennington College. More about reality blurred and Andy.