Jonathan and Victoria get eliminated.

Jonathan and Victoria get eliminated.
Ding, dong, the dick is gone. The Amazing Race 6‘s resident jerkhead Jonathan Baker and his wife Victoria Fuller were eliminated from the race last night, and the world rejoiced. The couple fell behind after they misread a clue and only took one donkey with them, when they should have had two. Of course, Jonathan–who inexplicably spent most of the episode either shirtless or in red boxer briefs–blamed this on Victoria; even if it was her fault, we’d never really know, since everything is her fault, including this cold weather. Dammit, Victoria! Despite the fact that they convinced Adam and Rebecca to yield another team, Jonathan and Victoria still ended up in last place after walking 18 miles out of their way. Phil paused from drama, and we knew that one more nonelimination leg remained. But fate smiled upon us and Phil said those joyous words: “you’ve both been eliminated from the race.” Phil asked if they felt like they’d let one another down, and Jonathan said no. In a voice over, Victoria had the final word, saying, “Despite the fact that we fought so much and we were so angry, we’re definitely connected at the soul, and we enjoyed every minute of the race, no matter what it may seem like.” No update yet on the couple’s web site; the last message posted is a Jan. 3 birthday wish from Victoria to Jonathan. Who knew that people without souls have birthdays?
+ also: In the New York Post, Jonathan does more damage control:

“I’m not this ugly person that I’ve been made out to be. … I took the game too seri ously and I took myself too seriously. … But most of all I didn’t like the person I saw up there. Victoria and I reconciled privately, but I didn’t like the person that I portrayed on the screen because I think I’m a better person than that. … I asked CBS, ‘Why did you do this?’ You know what they said to me? ‘We didn’t think it was going to get this out of control.’”

about the writer

Andy Dehnart is a journalist who has covered reality television for more than 15 years and created reality blurred in 2000. A member of the Television Critics Association, his writing and criticism about television, culture, and media has appeared on NPR and in Playboy, Buzzfeed, and many other publications. Andy, 36, also directs the journalism program at Stetson University in Florida, where he teaches creative nonfiction and journalism. He has an M.F.A. in nonfiction writing and literature from Bennington College. More about reality blurred and Andy.