Ami originally applied for The Amazing Race, admits she “got a little too confident.”

Ami originally applied for The Amazing Race, admits she “got a little too confident.”
Survivor Vanuatu‘s Ami Cusack admits that she made the fatal Survivor mistake and became too cocky. “I got a little too confident that it was going to be me and Leann in the final two for sure,” she tells TV Guide. She also says that the women’s alliance started with a discussion between Scout and Eliza. “It started out with Scout and Eliza talking about the fact that no women’s alliance had ever made it to the end. I’m like, ‘That is silly. Us ladies should be supporting each other and I’m willing to stand for that. I’d love for us to make it to the final four.'” Ami also says that she’s not a man-hater, and that she thought she had a friendship with Rory. “I really liked all the guys that we played with; it was just that my alliance was all women. I liked every one of them. In fact, I really got along with Rory. It is funny to see he was all mad at me and wasn’t liking me on the show–I was shocked! He and I were buddies, and I didn’t get it, until I saw the show, that he hated me so much. Call me na&#239ve.”

In a similar interview with The Advocate, the magazine reveals that Ami “and her girlfriend, Crissy, had auditioned to be on The Amazing Race, but producers instead asked Cusack to be an island castaway.” Ami tells the magazine she “didn’t think it was that big a deal” that Mark Burnett edited out her kissing her girlfriend. And
she says of Twila, “I think Twila’s just as queer as I am, god bless her! [laughs] If she’s not, she should be.”

The Sing-Off loses its star

Ben Folds

NBC's super-fun December a capella singing competition The Sing-Off is returning, but without its star judge, Ben Folds, and only as a two-hour special. Those are really depressing changes for a series that proved itself to be a super-fun show when it returned last December.


A film director talks about becoming a reality TV character

Anna Martemucci

What is it like to have your life turned into reality TV? Director Anna Martemucci, one of the two directors featured on Starz' exceptional reality series, talks about that, the competition, and her collaboration with her husband and brother-in-law.

Plus: How the show's producers tried to keep the $250,000 competition fair.

about the writer

Andy Dehnart is a journalist who has covered reality television for more than 15 years and created reality blurred in 2000. A member of the Television Critics Association, his writing and criticism about television, culture, and media has appeared on NPR and in Playboy, Buzzfeed, and many other publications. Andy, 36, also directs the journalism program at Stetson University in Florida, where he teaches creative nonfiction and journalism. He has an M.F.A. in nonfiction writing and literature from Bennington College. More about reality blurred and Andy.