media buyer: FOX reality shows “are not doing as well as we thought they would.”

media buyer: FOX reality shows “are not doing as well as we thought they would.”
FOX’s strategy of ripping off other network’s reality ideas and trying to copy its own successful shows seems to be failing. Its new shows aren’t doing well overall, and especially not in the 18 to 49 demo. For example, only 4.4 million people watched My Big Fat Obnoxious Boss‘s debut, which “placed Fox a distant fifth in the highly competitive hour,” as Reality TV World reports. Advertisers who bought ads upfront for shows such as The Swan 2 and The Rebel Billionaire aren’t happy. Mediaedge:cia’s Lyle Schwartz says, “Overall, the reality shows on Fox that our clients bought in the upfront … are not doing as well as we thought they would, and The Next Great Champ was canceled. … If all these shows keep delivering the way they have been, it could put significant pressure on Fox�s ad inventory as the season goes on.” Mediaweek reports that “The lone bright spot among the reality fare is Nanny 911, which after two episodes is producing a more solid 3.9 in adults 18-49.” And there may be help coming from American Idol 4. Schwartz says that the real test will come with its debut in January: “Idol has saved Fox for two years in a row. Can it do it again? We’ll have to wait and see.”

The Quest ends its journey stronger than it began

Verlox from The Quest

A review of the finale of summer's best reality series, which wasn't always perfect but was thoroughly entertaining right down to the finish, which included phenomenal challenges and special effects. Will ABC give it a second season?

Plus: an interview with the actor who played Verlox and the ogre.


Shark Tank is getting a spin-off

Shark Tank

Companies that get deals on the show will be followed for this new spin-off.

Also: Before the show began, Shark Barbara Corcoran was cast and then replaced--but then she sent this amazing e-mail and won the job.

about the writer

Andy Dehnart is a journalist who has covered reality television for more than 15 years and created reality blurred in 2000. A member of the Television Critics Association, his writing and criticism about television, culture, and media has appeared on NPR and in Playboy, Buzzfeed, and many other publications. Andy, 36, also directs the journalism program at Stetson University in Florida, where he teaches creative nonfiction and journalism. He has an M.F.A. in nonfiction writing and literature from Bennington College. More about reality blurred and Andy.