FOX airing My Big Fat Obnoxious Boss.

FOX airing My Big Fat Obnoxious Boss.
FOX can’t resist following up the train wreck that was My Big Fat Obnoxious Fiance, so the network has produced a series titled My Big Fat Obnoxious Boss. As the title suggests, it’s about an obnoxious boss, although he doesn’t appear to be anywhere near as fat as the obnoxious fiance. Spoofing The Apprentice, the series will debut Nov. 7 at 9 p.m. ET; on the show, “a dozen CEO wannabes compete to win the approval of N. Paul Todd, the eccentric, egomaniacal founder and CEO of fictional Chicago company Iocor,” according to Variety. Actors play Donald Trump, Carolyn, and George clones, and others. FOX reality guy Mike Darnell says “There’s an extraordinarily bitchy female VP … and a Smithers-like VP of questionable sexual orientation.” Variety says the challenges include one where “players are forced to beg for money on the street; in another, they become paintball targets as Mr. Todd tries to gun them down.” The gullible person who isn’t asked to “get the hell out of my office” will get $250,000. This sounds frighteningly like Andy Dick’s MTV summer series The Assistant, or as it was known in some circles, My Big Skinny Obnoxious Shrill Ambiguously Gay Once-Coked-Up Has-Been Comic.

The Sing-Off loses its star

Ben Folds

NBC's super-fun December a capella singing competition The Sing-Off is returning, but without its star judge, Ben Folds, and only as a two-hour special. Those are really depressing changes for a series that proved itself to be a super-fun show when it returned last December.


A film director talks about becoming a reality TV character

Anna Martemucci

What is it like to have your life turned into reality TV? Director Anna Martemucci, one of the two directors featured on Starz' exceptional reality series, talks about that, the competition, and her collaboration with her husband and brother-in-law.

Plus: How the show's producers tried to keep the $250,000 competition fair.

about the writer

Andy Dehnart is a journalist who has covered reality television for more than 15 years and created reality blurred in 2000. A member of the Television Critics Association, his writing and criticism about television, culture, and media has appeared on NPR and in Playboy, Buzzfeed, and many other publications. Andy, 36, also directs the journalism program at Stetson University in Florida, where he teaches creative nonfiction and journalism. He has an M.F.A. in nonfiction writing and literature from Bennington College. More about reality blurred and Andy.