Rod Stewart turns down MTV’s $45 million offer; Russell Simmons in talks.

Rod Stewart turns down MTV’s $45 million offer; Russell Simmons in talks.
At last, a reason to forgive Rod Stewart for “Downtown Train”: The pop singer has rejected a $45 million offer from MTV to turn his life into the next version of The Osbournes. Earlier reports said Stewart accepted an offer of $25 million for Rod: Live and Uncensored; this latest offer was reportedly $9 million upfront followed by $36 million if the show did well, according to World Entertainment News. He said no because “Private life is private,” and also probably because he’s already swimming in cash. However, he does understand why they approached him. “When I look at my household with my kids and dogs and dog shit, it’s very, very similar to Ozzy. Both of us have got this paranoia about dog poo. His family have four dogs and he said: ‘Every time I look at my lovely house there’s dog shit because all my kids have little chihuahuas,'” he says. Russell Simmons and Sean Combs, however, is apparently close to accepting an offer from MTV for a reality series called Simmons Inc: The First Family of Hip-Hop, according to The Hollywood Reporter. There’s no word of the money offered to them, but the paper says the pair “are teaming for” the show, which “will chronicle the life of a hip-hop family”; currently, “Simmons is talking to the cable channel about” it.

Frankie leads Big Brother's parade of delusion

Frankie on Big Brother

Heading into the finale, the delusion continues, with a re-appearance by evicted Frankie.

Related: The unwatchable cast of Fox's Utopia keeps yelling and screaming.


Shark Tank is getting a spin-off

Shark Tank

Companies that get deals on the show will be followed for this new spin-off.

Also: Before the show began, Shark Barbara Corcoran was cast and then replaced--but then she sent this amazing e-mail and won the job.

about the writer

Andy Dehnart is a journalist who has covered reality television for more than 15 years and created reality blurred in 2000. A member of the Television Critics Association, his writing and criticism about television, culture, and media has appeared on NPR and in Playboy, Buzzfeed, and many other publications. Andy, 36, also directs the journalism program at Stetson University in Florida, where he teaches creative nonfiction and journalism. He has an M.F.A. in nonfiction writing and literature from Bennington College. More about reality blurred and Andy.