Drew Daniel wins Big Brother 5.

Drew Daniel wins Big Brother 5.
With four of the seven jury votes, Drew Daniel won Big Brother 5. While Michael “Cowboy” Ellis received the twins’ votes, and a vote from the half-sister he betrayed, the other four jury members gave Drew credit for playing the game, rather than just riding along in Drew’s ass, as one of them tastefully put it. The finale was full of contentious moments, such as when Marvin asked Cowboy if he was “a racist liar or a lying racist.” Cowboy defended himself by showing that he’s truly a multicultural man who’s aware of all forms of diversity: “I love every type of race–Chinese, Japanese.” Later he said, “I’m not for no means” racist, which, well, you try to decode it. The reunion of the jury with the non-jury houseguests was also largely angry. For one, former bedfellows Scott and Jase aren’t speaking to one another, or at least Jase isn’t talking to Scott. Holly, unfortunately, was talking to everyone, shattering glass with her screeching complaints about Diane. Jase, appearing as though he was hopped up on something, kept talking about how Marvin only pretended to like Will. All the while, Julie Chen stood between the two groups and tried to maintain adequate posture. She failed.

The Sing-Off loses its star

Ben Folds

NBC's super-fun December a capella singing competition The Sing-Off is returning, but without its star judge, Ben Folds, and only as a two-hour special. Those are really depressing changes for a series that proved itself to be a super-fun show when it returned last December.


A film director talks about becoming a reality TV character

Anna Martemucci

What is it like to have your life turned into reality TV? Director Anna Martemucci, one of the two directors featured on Starz' exceptional reality series, talks about that, the competition, and her collaboration with her husband and brother-in-law.

Plus: How the show's producers tried to keep the $250,000 competition fair.

about the writer

Andy Dehnart is a journalist who has covered reality television for more than 15 years and created reality blurred in 2000. A member of the Television Critics Association, his writing and criticism about television, culture, and media has appeared on NPR and in Playboy, Buzzfeed, and many other publications. Andy, 36, also directs the journalism program at Stetson University in Florida, where he teaches creative nonfiction and journalism. He has an M.F.A. in nonfiction writing and literature from Bennington College. More about reality blurred and Andy.