Paris Hilton threw things at producers trying to convince her to do a third season.

Paris Hilton threw things at producers trying to convince her to do a third season.
I’ve become excruciatingly bored with Paris Hilton lately, mostly because she keeps popping up all over the place after doing absolutely nothing, sort of like a one-person political convention. She lost her dog, or maybe not, and then found it; good gosh, who cares. It’s clearly all just a publicity stunt for her dog’s book, The Tinkerbell Hilton Diaries: My Life Tailing Paris Hilton, which is in stores today. Sad that her dog was able to write its book faster than Paris was able to write her memoir, Confessions of an Heiress: A Tongue-in-Chic Peek Behind the Pose, which doesn’t come out for another week. If you can muster up the courage to care for another few seconds, Paris also has her own logo now, as discovered in the files of the US Trademark office by The Smoking Gun. And even if you don’t have Defamer’s helpful illustrated guide to point out the obvious, it looks exactly like what Paris will always be most famous for. Anyway, after this string of non-news news, Paris has finally done something newsworthy: freaked out at producers and others who were trying to convince her to do a third season of The Simple Life. This contradicts earlier reports that a third season was already a done deal, but who cares, she (allegedly) threw things. According to Teen Hollywood and the World Entertainment News Network, an insider reports that FOX is “desperate to bring Paris and Nicole back.” However, the site reports that “when show executives offered her a basketful of gifts in a bid to change her mind, Hilton threw it back at a terrified producer, shouting, ‘I’ll never do another series of that show.’ One astonished observer says, ‘She was screaming and bellowing things like, ‘I don’t need you,’ and ‘I’m a big star and I don’t need your cr**py gifts.’” Damn, Paris said “crappy”–she must really be pissed. Hot.

about the writer

Andy Dehnart is a journalist who has covered reality television for more than 15 years and created reality blurred in 2000. A member of the Television Critics Association, his writing and criticism about television, culture, and media has appeared on NPR and in Playboy, Buzzfeed, and many other publications. Andy, 36, also directs the journalism program at Stetson University in Florida, where he teaches creative nonfiction and journalism. He has an M.F.A. in nonfiction writing and literature from Bennington College. More about reality blurred and Andy.