LA Spanish-language show lets players compete for lawyers to help with residency.

LA Spanish-language show lets players compete for lawyers to help with residency.
Gana la Verde, or Win the Green, “has consistently reached an average of 1 million Latino households. Last week, the show was No. 2 among 18- to 49-year-old Latino viewers.” The reason: this nightly series, which airs on LA’s KRCA-TV Channel 62, offers as its prize “a set of immigration lawyers, who for one year work to expedite the residency process,” the LA Times reports. The series sounds like Fear Factor, as contestants have “swallowed 38 grams of live tequila worms, … trap[ped] a slippery pig drenched in butter, [and] … jumped six times from one 18-wheeler traveling 60 mph to another in pursuit of six tiny green flags.” Being on the show has other risks, too, because of contestants’ undocumented status: an immigration department official tells the Times, “we remind people they are potentially subject to arrest. In some instances, we are obliged to act.”

The Quest ends its journey stronger than it began

Verlox from The Quest

A review of the finale of summer's best reality series, which wasn't always perfect but was thoroughly entertaining right down to the finish, which included phenomenal challenges and special effects. Will ABC give it a second season?

Plus: an interview with the actor who played Verlox and the ogre.


Shark Tank is getting a spin-off

Shark Tank

Companies that get deals on the show will be followed for this new spin-off.

Also: Before the show began, Shark Barbara Corcoran was cast and then replaced--but then she sent this amazing e-mail and won the job.

about the writer

Andy Dehnart is a journalist who has covered reality television for more than 15 years and created reality blurred in 2000. A member of the Television Critics Association, his writing and criticism about television, culture, and media has appeared on NPR and in Playboy, Buzzfeed, and many other publications. Andy, 36, also directs the journalism program at Stetson University in Florida, where he teaches creative nonfiction and journalism. He has an M.F.A. in nonfiction writing and literature from Bennington College. More about reality blurred and Andy.