mother says Showbiz Moms and Dads “ripped us apart”; critics say it’s “riveting.”

mother says Showbiz Moms and Dads “ripped us apart”; critics say it’s “riveting.”
This week, The New Yorker reviews Bravo’s new series Showbiz Moms and Dads, finding that “when it comes to the way parents treat their children, judgments are impossible to avoid.” That judgment has left one of the parents feeling betrayed. Debbie Tye tells the St. Petersburg Times that she was misled: “We were specifically told this would be a positive look at pageantry. And I can almost guarantee that every family went into this thinking that their kids would get work and be shown to be hardworking. (Instead), they completely portrayed me as a pushy pageant mother.” She says, “They’ve really ripped us apart.” The New Yorker’s compares Tye’s daughter Emily to JonBenet Ramsey, writing that, “There is a universe of difference between being arguably ill used and being killed, and yet it is hard to avoid the language of crime when it comes to these pageants. One feels that Emily is, at the very least, being robbed of her childhood, and even of her essential femaleness, which is repeatedly buried under a pile of fluffy feminine trappings.” Other critics have called the series “riveting” and “fascinating”; the second episode repeats tonight at 6 p.m. ET and midnight, and Sunday at 11:30 a.m. It airs Tuesdays at 9 p.m. ET.

about the writer

Andy Dehnart is a journalist who has covered reality television for more than 15 years and created reality blurred in 2000. A member of the Television Critics Association, his writing and criticism about television, culture, and media has appeared on NPR and in Playboy, Buzzfeed, and many other publications. Andy, 36, also directs the journalism program at Stetson University in Florida, where he teaches creative nonfiction and journalism. He has an M.F.A. in nonfiction writing and literature from Bennington College. More about reality blurred and Andy.