Saboga tribe dissolved, and Richard Hatch is Mogo Mogo’s first casulaty.

Saboga tribe dissolved, and Richard Hatch is Mogo Mogo’s first casualty.
For Saboga, losing the reward challenge meant losing their tribe, as Survivor All-Stars unveiled its first big twist. The two victorious tribes selected new members, a la a game of elementary school dodge ball, and Mogo Mogo picked Ethan first, with the goal of getting rid of him. Jerri also joined Mogo Mogo, while Chapera picked Rupert and got Jenna L., who was last to be chosen. After losing the immunity challenge, Mogo Mogo switched tracks, with Colby, Ethan, and Lex aligning to boot Richard. Although Rich caught on to Colby’s plan (“How dare you?…You must go bye bye now.”), his entire tribe turned against him, and the player who wrote the rules on the first Survivor found his strategy turned against him. But he will linger on: Rich rubbed up against Sue while naked during the immunity challenge, and the previews for next week’s episode showed an angry, crying Sue yelling at Jeff Probst According to Jeff Varner’s report on the TV Guide Channel, a female contestant “decides to quit, threatening legal action” after “a nude male contestant physically contacts a female contestant.”
+ also: episode results discredit spoiler Skeet28, who may or may not have been a plant of Mark Burnett’s.

The Sing-Off loses its star

Ben Folds

NBC's super-fun December a capella singing competition The Sing-Off is returning, but without its star judge, Ben Folds, and only as a two-hour special. Those are really depressing changes for a series that proved itself to be a super-fun show when it returned last December.


A film director talks about becoming a reality TV character

Anna Martemucci

What is it like to have your life turned into reality TV? Director Anna Martemucci, one of the two directors featured on Starz' exceptional reality series, talks about that, the competition, and her collaboration with her husband and brother-in-law.

Plus: How the show's producers tried to keep the $250,000 competition fair.

about the writer

Andy Dehnart is a journalist who has covered reality television for more than 15 years and created reality blurred in 2000. A member of the Television Critics Association, his writing and criticism about television, culture, and media has appeared on NPR and in Playboy, Buzzfeed, and many other publications. Andy, 36, also directs the journalism program at Stetson University in Florida, where he teaches creative nonfiction and journalism. He has an M.F.A. in nonfiction writing and literature from Bennington College. More about reality blurred and Andy.