Average Joe 3 will star rejected Adam; Average Joe 2’s David is an actor.

Average Joe 3 will star rejected Adam; Average Joe 2’s David is an actor.
NBC will follow the second season of its latest reality TV series with Average Joe 3, which will be subtitled Adam Returns. That’s because it stars Adam Mesh, the average guy Melana rejected in favor of the not-so-average guy at the end of the first season. The show is scheduled to debut March 15, the New York Post reports. NBC is accepting applications on its site; they’re due Jan. 28. The network has also posted an ad seeking women for the show on Showfax, which advertises casting calls to actors. The casting call is more specific, asking for “outgoing attractive single women of all ethnicities 21 to 35″ who “must be familiar with the outcome of the first” show. That posting is oddly appropriate because, as reader Jess points out again, yet another cast member has been outed as an actor. Average Joe 2: Hawaii‘s David Daskal has been in six films and five TV shows, plus a bunch of theatre productions. His profile mentions his stats (shoe size: 9.5), and identifies him as a member of SAG. His NBC profile says he’s a “mail sorter.”

The Sing-Off loses its star

Ben Folds

NBC's super-fun December a capella singing competition The Sing-Off is returning, but without its star judge, Ben Folds, and only as a two-hour special. Those are really depressing changes for a series that proved itself to be a super-fun show when it returned last December.


A film director talks about becoming a reality TV character

Anna Martemucci

What is it like to have your life turned into reality TV? Director Anna Martemucci, one of the two directors featured on Starz' exceptional reality series, talks about that, the competition, and her collaboration with her husband and brother-in-law.

Plus: How the show's producers tried to keep the $250,000 competition fair.

about the writer

Andy Dehnart is a journalist who has covered reality television for more than 15 years and created reality blurred in 2000. A member of the Television Critics Association, his writing and criticism about television, culture, and media has appeared on NPR and in Playboy, Buzzfeed, and many other publications. Andy, 36, also directs the journalism program at Stetson University in Florida, where he teaches creative nonfiction and journalism. He has an M.F.A. in nonfiction writing and literature from Bennington College. More about reality blurred and Andy.