OJ Simpson hasn’t agreed to participate in reality TV show starring himself.

OJ Simpson hasn’t agreed to participate in reality TV show starring himself.
A small satellite TV network announced earlier this week that it had plans to produce a reality TV show that would follow OJ Simpson Osbournes-style. Marcia Clark even called it “macabre.” There’s one little problem: OJ hasn’t agree to participate in the program, which apparently focuses on OJ “at hip-hop concerts.” Then again, that may not be a problem, since the production company, Spiderboy, says it has “been placing OJ Simpson in various public locations around the US” and then filming the results, according to the BBC. And Entertainment Weekly reports that the company already has “13 weeks worth of episodes” finished. They were “shot during the last two years, [and] will premiere in June on the network’s 75 independent broadcast outlets, which reach 22 million homes.” OJ’s lawyers tell the BBC that OJ is “not in a show,” while The LA Times quotes his lawyer as saying, “If they think clips of O.J. have commercial value, more power to them. But we haven’t been asked to narrate them or edit them or comment on them. Nor would we.”

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about the writer

Andy Dehnart is a journalist who has covered reality television for more than 15 years and created reality blurred in 2000. A member of the Television Critics Association, his writing and criticism about television, culture, and media has appeared on NPR and in Playboy, Buzzfeed, and many other publications. Andy, 36, also directs the journalism program at Stetson University in Florida, where he teaches creative nonfiction and journalism. He has an M.F.A. in nonfiction writing and literature from Bennington College. More about reality blurred and Andy.